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#California

Basic 7 Millions In Relief Funding

Broadband Providers Raise Coverage Concerns Over Basic 7 Millions In Relief Funding

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Broadband providers in the US have raised concerns over the distribution of relief funding. [[1](https://www.mcguirewoods.com/client-resources/Alerts/2023/3/provider-relief-fund)] Initial estimates suggest that millions of Americans may not receive adequate coverage and support, leading to increased financial pressures on already struggling households.

Direct Auto Insurance Car Accident Claim Time Limits in California

Direct Auto Insurance Car Accident

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With car accidents comes the need to file an insurance claim. In California, you have up to three years to file for property damage [[1](https://mileylegal.com/car-accident-insurance-claim-time-limit/)] and up to 15 days to acknowledge and investigate a claim [[2](https://www.insurance.ca.gov/01-consumers/105-type/95-guides/01-auto/hadaccident.cfm)]. Filing sooner is recommended, however, as the longer you wait the higher the chance of missing out of financial recovery [[3](https://www.thebarnesfirm.com/how-long-do-i-have-to-file-a-car-accident-claim-in-california/)].

AAA Insurance Car Accident Claim Time Limit in California

AAA Insurance Car Accident Claim Time Limit in California

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AAA Insurance requires Californians to file car accident claims within two years of the incident. But they provide assistance and forms to start the process within 15 days of the accident. [[2](https://jnylaw.com/aaa-insurance-car-accident-claim-time-limit-in-california/)]

Is it Illegal to Not Report a Car Accident in California?

Is it Illegal to Not Report a Car Accident in California?

California residents must report any car crash with property damage exceeding $1,000 or any injury to the DMV. Failure to do so can result in fines, driver’s license suspension, and other penalties [[1](https://catsip.berkeley.edu/resources/role-media-and-road-safety)].

What is the Difference Between Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress (IIED) and Negligent Infliction of Emotional Distress (NIED) in California?

What is the Difference Between Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress (IIED) and Negligent Infliction of Emotional Distress (NIED) in California?

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Understanding the difference between Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress (IIED) and Negligent Infliction of Emotional Distress (NIED) in California is an important part of the legal process. While IIED focuses on the defendant’s intent, NIED assumes the defendant failed to fulfill a legal duty [[1](https://www.findlaw.com/injury/torts-and-personal-injuries/nied-negligent-infliction-of-emotional-distress.html)], [[2](https://www.shouselaw.com/ca/personal-injury/negligent-infliction-of-emotional-distress/)]. Whereas IIED requires physical damage to be proven, NIED only requires an individual to prove that their emotional distress was caused by the defendant’s wrongdoing [[3](https://jnylaw.com/what-is-the-difference-between-iied-and-neid-california/)].

Jaywalking is Now Legal in California – Freedom To Walk Act

Jaywalking is Now Legal in California – Freedom To Walk Act

California has taken a step towards a more pedestrian-friendly environment. In July 2023, Gov. Newsom signed the Freedom To Walk Act, making jaywalking legal in the state for the first time. [[2](https://krcrtv.com/news/local/the-freedom-to-walk-act-signed-by-newsom-to-reform-californias-jaywalking-laws)]